Visual Stories
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 Earl Granville enlisted in the Unites States Army Guard with his twin bother Joseph.  The brothers were deployed to Bosnia and Iraq together. On Earls third deployment to Afghanistan his legs were blown apart after the truck he was riding in hit an roadside bomb. Joseph suffered for guilt and PTSD after Earls injuries.  On December 18th, 2010, Joseph took his own life.   Earl visits Josephs grave site at Our Mother of Sorrows Cemetery Finch Hill in Carbondale, Pa. Photo by Jake Danna Stevens

Earl Granville enlisted in the Unites States Army Guard with his twin bother Joseph.  The brothers were deployed to Bosnia and Iraq together. On Earls third deployment to Afghanistan his legs were blown apart after the truck he was riding in hit an roadside bomb. Joseph suffered for guilt and PTSD after Earls injuries.  On December 18th, 2010, Joseph took his own life.   Earl visits Josephs grave site at Our Mother of Sorrows Cemetery Finch Hill in Carbondale, Pa. Photo by Jake Danna Stevens

 Earl Granville said he recently started wearing a dog tag with Joseph's photo on it while participating in obstacle course races.  Participating in OCRs and other sporting events has helped Earl find people who have a positive influence on his life

Earl Granville said he recently started wearing a dog tag with Joseph's photo on it while participating in obstacle course races.  Participating in OCRs and other sporting events has helped Earl find people who have a positive influence on his life

 "I've gone through a lot of counseling myself and I feel like it helped me get to were I am now" said Earl Granville.  Paul Luongo a graduate student in the Clinical Mental Health Counseling program at the University of Scranton works with Earl Granville as they talk about Granville's mental well being at the University of Scranton in Scranton, Pa.  Granville is currently pursuing a bachelor's degree in Clinical Mental Health Counseling at the University of Scranton. Earl helped establish the University of Scranton's Veterans Club. One of the main goals of the club is to make it easier for returning veterans to find  the resources that are available to them.  

"I've gone through a lot of counseling myself and I feel like it helped me get to were I am now" said Earl Granville.  Paul Luongo a graduate student in the Clinical Mental Health Counseling program at the University of Scranton works with Earl Granville as they talk about Granville's mental well being at the University of Scranton in Scranton, Pa.  Granville is currently pursuing a bachelor's degree in Clinical Mental Health Counseling at the University of Scranton. Earl helped establish the University of Scranton's Veterans Club. One of the main goals of the club is to make it easier for returning veterans to find  the resources that are available to them.  

 "You just have to surround yourself with good people and filter out the bad," said Earl Granville (center). Granville listens to his USA Warriors coach Mike Doyle of Aston, Pa. Doyle coaches the team during half time of a game against the Philadelphia Flyers sled hockey team at IceWorks Skating Complex in Aston, PA.  The team is made up military members who have been wounded in defense of the United States.

"You just have to surround yourself with good people and filter out the bad," said Earl Granville (center). Granville listens to his USA Warriors coach Mike Doyle of Aston, Pa. Doyle coaches the team during half time of a game against the Philadelphia Flyers sled hockey team at IceWorks Skating Complex in Aston, PA.  The team is made up military members who have been wounded in defense of the United States.

 "I can't remember how life was when I had two legs," said Earl Granville, "yea, it would be nice to have two legs again but I'm doing pretty good with just one."  Granville works out at Crossfit Scranton.

"I can't remember how life was when I had two legs," said Earl Granville, "yea, it would be nice to have two legs again but I'm doing pretty good with just one."  Granville works out at Crossfit Scranton.

 "I'm very active, so sometimes I get an infection which can leave me off my prosthetic for a little while," said Earl Granville.  After participating in a sled hockey game Granville traveled to the Philadelphia VA Medical Center to have an infection checked by a doctor.

"I'm very active, so sometimes I get an infection which can leave me off my prosthetic for a little while," said Earl Granville.  After participating in a sled hockey game Granville traveled to the Philadelphia VA Medical Center to have an infection checked by a doctor.

 Granville holds up a prosthetic leg belonging to double amputee Army CPT Mark Little (Ret.) before the Tunnel to Towers 5k. Air Force medic and NCO Charla Winters (left) was Earl's nurse in Germany and Lilly Adams of Chevy Chase, Maryland also wait to start the run.  "I took the path of resiliency, I was just happy to be alive, I was the lone U.S military survivor in my Humvee when we hit that road side bomb in Afghanistan. My two comrades, SPC Derek Holland of Wind Gap, Pennsylvania, and Major Scott Haggerty of Still Water, Oklahoma, they were killed instantly. I was lucky just to lose a leg," said Earl Granville.

Granville holds up a prosthetic leg belonging to double amputee Army CPT Mark Little (Ret.) before the Tunnel to Towers 5k. Air Force medic and NCO Charla Winters (left) was Earl's nurse in Germany and Lilly Adams of Chevy Chase, Maryland also wait to start the run.  "I took the path of resiliency, I was just happy to be alive, I was the lone U.S military survivor in my Humvee when we hit that road side bomb in Afghanistan. My two comrades, SPC Derek Holland of Wind Gap, Pennsylvania, and Major Scott Haggerty of Still Water, Oklahoma, they were killed instantly. I was lucky just to lose a leg," said Earl Granville.

 Paramedic Emily Prezzano of Westchester, Ny., had not been to Ground Zero since a week after the September 11th attacks.  It made it a lot easier knowing everything he as gone through and has not given up said Prezzano, running with him helped me get over the fear of being there again.  Earl and Emily run hand in hand on West Street. towards Ground Zero in New York City during the Tunnel to Towers 5k.  Also running with Earl in background are Air Force medic and NCO Charla Winters (center) who was Earl's nurse in Germany and Army CPT Mark Little (left) a double amputee. 

Paramedic Emily Prezzano of Westchester, Ny., had not been to Ground Zero since a week after the September 11th attacks.  It made it a lot easier knowing everything he as gone through and has not given up said Prezzano, running with him helped me get over the fear of being there again.  Earl and Emily run hand in hand on West Street. towards Ground Zero in New York City during the Tunnel to Towers 5k.  Also running with Earl in background are Air Force medic and NCO Charla Winters (center) who was Earl's nurse in Germany and Army CPT Mark Little (left) a double amputee. 

 "Derek was only twenty years old when he passed away, He was the baby of our platoon," said Granville, "Derek was always making me laugh, I liked that about him." Earl Granville (left) stand with the parents of SPC Derek Holland, Kathy Andreas-Heath and Michael Heath. They visit Fort Indiantown Gap National Cemetery for the fifth anniversary of Holland's death. Holland was riding in a Humvee with Earl when the roadside bomb took his life on June 3, 2008.

"Derek was only twenty years old when he passed away, He was the baby of our platoon," said Granville, "Derek was always making me laugh, I liked that about him." Earl Granville (left) stand with the parents of SPC Derek Holland, Kathy Andreas-Heath and Michael Heath. They visit Fort Indiantown Gap National Cemetery for the fifth anniversary of Holland's death. Holland was riding in a Humvee with Earl when the roadside bomb took his life on June 3, 2008.

 Earl Granville waits to watch PBS's National Memorial Day Concert featuring a story about what he has gone through with the lose of his twin brother Joseph Granville and the lose of his leg on the West Lawn of the U.S. Capitol in Washington, DC. 

Earl Granville waits to watch PBS's National Memorial Day Concert featuring a story about what he has gone through with the lose of his twin brother Joseph Granville and the lose of his leg on the West Lawn of the U.S. Capitol in Washington, DC. 

 Earl Granville holds the hand of Joseph Granville's son Jonathan as he is hugged by his mother Stephanie Granville and grandmother Margaret Mesiti Granville (Earl and Joseph's mother) during PBS's National Memorial Day Concert honoring Earl and Joseph on the West Lawn of the U.S. Capitol in Washington, DC.

Earl Granville holds the hand of Joseph Granville's son Jonathan as he is hugged by his mother Stephanie Granville and grandmother Margaret Mesiti Granville (Earl and Joseph's mother) during PBS's National Memorial Day Concert honoring Earl and Joseph on the West Lawn of the U.S. Capitol in Washington, DC.

 A huge problem with the military we have today is post traumatic stress and a lot of them are just taking their own lives said Earl Granville,  there is something I would like to do about it.  A wounded veteran approached earl and confided to him about some of the issues he is dealing with after PBS's National Memorial Day Concert on the West Lawn of the U.S. Capitol in Washington, DC. 

A huge problem with the military we have today is post traumatic stress and a lot of them are just taking their own lives said Earl Granville,  there is something I would like to do about it.  A wounded veteran approached earl and confided to him about some of the issues he is dealing with after PBS's National Memorial Day Concert on the West Lawn of the U.S. Capitol in Washington, DC. 

 "I can reach out to these returning vets a lot better then somebody who has not been to combat," said Earl, "I would love to see how the military would get a hold of mental heath." Earl walks on 15th St. NW next to the Department of Treasury while trying to create awareness for veterans who are in distress, in Washington, D.C.  

"I can reach out to these returning vets a lot better then somebody who has not been to combat," said Earl, "I would love to see how the military would get a hold of mental heath." Earl walks on 15th St. NW next to the Department of Treasury while trying to create awareness for veterans who are in distress, in Washington, D.C.  

Earl Granville enlisted in the Unites States Army Guard with his twin bother Joseph.  The brothers were deployed to Bosnia and Iraq together. On Earls third deployment to Afghanistan his legs were blown apart after the truck he was riding in hit an roadside bomb. Joseph suffered for guilt and PTSD after Earls injuries.  On December 18th, 2010, Joseph took his own life.   Earl visits Josephs grave site at Our Mother of Sorrows Cemetery Finch Hill in Carbondale, Pa. Photo by Jake Danna Stevens

Earl Granville said he recently started wearing a dog tag with Joseph's photo on it while participating in obstacle course races.  Participating in OCRs and other sporting events has helped Earl find people who have a positive influence on his life

"I've gone through a lot of counseling myself and I feel like it helped me get to were I am now" said Earl Granville.  Paul Luongo a graduate student in the Clinical Mental Health Counseling program at the University of Scranton works with Earl Granville as they talk about Granville's mental well being at the University of Scranton in Scranton, Pa.  Granville is currently pursuing a bachelor's degree in Clinical Mental Health Counseling at the University of Scranton. Earl helped establish the University of Scranton's Veterans Club. One of the main goals of the club is to make it easier for returning veterans to find  the resources that are available to them.  

"You just have to surround yourself with good people and filter out the bad," said Earl Granville (center). Granville listens to his USA Warriors coach Mike Doyle of Aston, Pa. Doyle coaches the team during half time of a game against the Philadelphia Flyers sled hockey team at IceWorks Skating Complex in Aston, PA.  The team is made up military members who have been wounded in defense of the United States.

"I can't remember how life was when I had two legs," said Earl Granville, "yea, it would be nice to have two legs again but I'm doing pretty good with just one."  Granville works out at Crossfit Scranton.

"I'm very active, so sometimes I get an infection which can leave me off my prosthetic for a little while," said Earl Granville.  After participating in a sled hockey game Granville traveled to the Philadelphia VA Medical Center to have an infection checked by a doctor.

Granville holds up a prosthetic leg belonging to double amputee Army CPT Mark Little (Ret.) before the Tunnel to Towers 5k. Air Force medic and NCO Charla Winters (left) was Earl's nurse in Germany and Lilly Adams of Chevy Chase, Maryland also wait to start the run.  "I took the path of resiliency, I was just happy to be alive, I was the lone U.S military survivor in my Humvee when we hit that road side bomb in Afghanistan. My two comrades, SPC Derek Holland of Wind Gap, Pennsylvania, and Major Scott Haggerty of Still Water, Oklahoma, they were killed instantly. I was lucky just to lose a leg," said Earl Granville.

Paramedic Emily Prezzano of Westchester, Ny., had not been to Ground Zero since a week after the September 11th attacks.  It made it a lot easier knowing everything he as gone through and has not given up said Prezzano, running with him helped me get over the fear of being there again.  Earl and Emily run hand in hand on West Street. towards Ground Zero in New York City during the Tunnel to Towers 5k.  Also running with Earl in background are Air Force medic and NCO Charla Winters (center) who was Earl's nurse in Germany and Army CPT Mark Little (left) a double amputee. 

"Derek was only twenty years old when he passed away, He was the baby of our platoon," said Granville, "Derek was always making me laugh, I liked that about him." Earl Granville (left) stand with the parents of SPC Derek Holland, Kathy Andreas-Heath and Michael Heath. They visit Fort Indiantown Gap National Cemetery for the fifth anniversary of Holland's death. Holland was riding in a Humvee with Earl when the roadside bomb took his life on June 3, 2008.

Earl Granville waits to watch PBS's National Memorial Day Concert featuring a story about what he has gone through with the lose of his twin brother Joseph Granville and the lose of his leg on the West Lawn of the U.S. Capitol in Washington, DC. 

Earl Granville holds the hand of Joseph Granville's son Jonathan as he is hugged by his mother Stephanie Granville and grandmother Margaret Mesiti Granville (Earl and Joseph's mother) during PBS's National Memorial Day Concert honoring Earl and Joseph on the West Lawn of the U.S. Capitol in Washington, DC.

A huge problem with the military we have today is post traumatic stress and a lot of them are just taking their own lives said Earl Granville,  there is something I would like to do about it.  A wounded veteran approached earl and confided to him about some of the issues he is dealing with after PBS's National Memorial Day Concert on the West Lawn of the U.S. Capitol in Washington, DC. 

"I can reach out to these returning vets a lot better then somebody who has not been to combat," said Earl, "I would love to see how the military would get a hold of mental heath." Earl walks on 15th St. NW next to the Department of Treasury while trying to create awareness for veterans who are in distress, in Washington, D.C.  

 Earl Granville enlisted in the Unites States Army Guard with his twin bother Joseph.  The brothers were deployed to Bosnia and Iraq together. On Earls third deployment to Afghanistan his legs were blown apart after the truck he was riding in hit an roadside bomb. Joseph suffered for guilt and PTSD after Earls injuries.  On December 18th, 2010, Joseph took his own life.   Earl visits Josephs grave site at Our Mother of Sorrows Cemetery Finch Hill in Carbondale, Pa. Photo by Jake Danna Stevens
 Earl Granville said he recently started wearing a dog tag with Joseph's photo on it while participating in obstacle course races.  Participating in OCRs and other sporting events has helped Earl find people who have a positive influence on his life
 "I've gone through a lot of counseling myself and I feel like it helped me get to were I am now" said Earl Granville.  Paul Luongo a graduate student in the Clinical Mental Health Counseling program at the University of Scranton works with Earl Granville as they talk about Granville's mental well being at the University of Scranton in Scranton, Pa.  Granville is currently pursuing a bachelor's degree in Clinical Mental Health Counseling at the University of Scranton. Earl helped establish the University of Scranton's Veterans Club. One of the main goals of the club is to make it easier for returning veterans to find  the resources that are available to them.  
 "You just have to surround yourself with good people and filter out the bad," said Earl Granville (center). Granville listens to his USA Warriors coach Mike Doyle of Aston, Pa. Doyle coaches the team during half time of a game against the Philadelphia Flyers sled hockey team at IceWorks Skating Complex in Aston, PA.  The team is made up military members who have been wounded in defense of the United States.
 "I can't remember how life was when I had two legs," said Earl Granville, "yea, it would be nice to have two legs again but I'm doing pretty good with just one."  Granville works out at Crossfit Scranton.
 "I'm very active, so sometimes I get an infection which can leave me off my prosthetic for a little while," said Earl Granville.  After participating in a sled hockey game Granville traveled to the Philadelphia VA Medical Center to have an infection checked by a doctor.
 Granville holds up a prosthetic leg belonging to double amputee Army CPT Mark Little (Ret.) before the Tunnel to Towers 5k. Air Force medic and NCO Charla Winters (left) was Earl's nurse in Germany and Lilly Adams of Chevy Chase, Maryland also wait to start the run.  "I took the path of resiliency, I was just happy to be alive, I was the lone U.S military survivor in my Humvee when we hit that road side bomb in Afghanistan. My two comrades, SPC Derek Holland of Wind Gap, Pennsylvania, and Major Scott Haggerty of Still Water, Oklahoma, they were killed instantly. I was lucky just to lose a leg," said Earl Granville.
 Paramedic Emily Prezzano of Westchester, Ny., had not been to Ground Zero since a week after the September 11th attacks.  It made it a lot easier knowing everything he as gone through and has not given up said Prezzano, running with him helped me get over the fear of being there again.  Earl and Emily run hand in hand on West Street. towards Ground Zero in New York City during the Tunnel to Towers 5k.  Also running with Earl in background are Air Force medic and NCO Charla Winters (center) who was Earl's nurse in Germany and Army CPT Mark Little (left) a double amputee. 
 "Derek was only twenty years old when he passed away, He was the baby of our platoon," said Granville, "Derek was always making me laugh, I liked that about him." Earl Granville (left) stand with the parents of SPC Derek Holland, Kathy Andreas-Heath and Michael Heath. They visit Fort Indiantown Gap National Cemetery for the fifth anniversary of Holland's death. Holland was riding in a Humvee with Earl when the roadside bomb took his life on June 3, 2008.
 Earl Granville waits to watch PBS's National Memorial Day Concert featuring a story about what he has gone through with the lose of his twin brother Joseph Granville and the lose of his leg on the West Lawn of the U.S. Capitol in Washington, DC. 
 Earl Granville holds the hand of Joseph Granville's son Jonathan as he is hugged by his mother Stephanie Granville and grandmother Margaret Mesiti Granville (Earl and Joseph's mother) during PBS's National Memorial Day Concert honoring Earl and Joseph on the West Lawn of the U.S. Capitol in Washington, DC.
 A huge problem with the military we have today is post traumatic stress and a lot of them are just taking their own lives said Earl Granville,  there is something I would like to do about it.  A wounded veteran approached earl and confided to him about some of the issues he is dealing with after PBS's National Memorial Day Concert on the West Lawn of the U.S. Capitol in Washington, DC. 
 "I can reach out to these returning vets a lot better then somebody who has not been to combat," said Earl, "I would love to see how the military would get a hold of mental heath." Earl walks on 15th St. NW next to the Department of Treasury while trying to create awareness for veterans who are in distress, in Washington, D.C.